Unique to Montessori pedagogy are carefully designed activities for coordination of muscle and movement; sensory motor refinement; verbal and written language learning, mathematical concepts and cultural & environmental appreciation.

When you look around a Montessori classroom, you will see the Montessori curriculum in all the activities and materials that are on the shelves.

We take pride in providing the children with a solid foundation to become life-long learners and the daily practice of Montessori philosophy is made possible by a clearly defined Montessori curriculum framework, which includes:
Practical Life Activities
Sensorial Activities
Language
Mathematics
Cultural (Botany, Zoology, Geography, Science, History, Art, Music, Peace Education)

Practical Life Activities

These are activities connected with looking after yourself and your surroundings, such as getting dressed, preparing food, laying the table, wiping the floor, clearing dishes, doing the dusting, etc.. Whilst these are the tasks that adults like least; children between the ages of one and four years, love these jobs and are delighted to be called on to participate in them.

The materials provide the link between home and school, and are used to develop co-ordination, concentration and independence.

Sensorial Activities

Materials are designed to help children become more perceptive, to understand concrete concepts and focus on the details that will allow them to abstract into the world around them. Sensorial activities involve grading, pairing, sequencing, matching shapes, touch, taste, color and sound.

Language

These materials increase vocabulary, explore the sounds and syntax of the English language and help the children to read and write. The teaching of English begins with stories, speaking and drama games, through to working with the sandpaper letters, writing with the movable alphabet and then on to reading.

Mathematics

All mathematics concepts are taught first in the concrete, hands-on material create an enjoyable introduction to the basic concepts, four rules of number, algebra and geometry. Children learn to count and are then introduced to the decimal system and fractions. From this firm base children rarely have difficulty moving into abstraction.

Cultural (Botany, Zoology, Geography, Science, History, Art, Music, Peace Education)

This area of the environment provides children with an introduction to all the cultural subjects. The concrete materials include globes, puzzle maps for geography, bells for music and simple science experiments.